Call depression what it really is… in memory of Robin Williams, RIP

Thank you Monica, for your post about Robin Williams and the additional posts continuing the dialogue on suicide.

Everything Matters: Beyond Meds

We are all reeling from the death of Robin Williams. Suicide shocks. Always. I feel as though a tsunami gestalt process has begun as a result of this particular human being given his social position. I wish it didn’t come to us this way.

I want to bow deeply in honor to this funny man and thank him for his time of service on this earth. Thank you Robin Williams.

I also am posting a few thoughts that have arisen today and some information about suicide so that we might learn to be profoundly present to the pain of others…that we might learn to support those living with suicidal feelings….

From a Facebook status update:

Call depression what it really is: Despair, loneliness, helplessness, melancholy, pain, anguish, discouragement, misery, sorrow, wretchedness, shame…

The term depression obfuscates and distances…it’s meaningless

My husband read that and shared this:

this is what William…

View original post 1,058 more words

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About Casey

“the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes ‘Awww!’ ~ Jack Kerouac, On The Road Again
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5 Responses to Call depression what it really is… in memory of Robin Williams, RIP

  1. shoe1000 says:

    Casey,
    I dont have a problem with what I have not being called depression. What do I call it, then? How do I communicate with those fellow sufferers without having a shared language. I read the article and the post that Monica’s post came out of.
    I am still not convinced that it is a mental disorder. I firmly believe that most of we call depression comes from the “deep seated, sometimes quite forgotten, emotional conflicts that persist below the level of our consciousness. Tomorrows post is on this very subject.
    Nowhere in there do they look at PTSD from the abuse we have come to see as normal in this culture. Should I tell people that my Dad beat me, my Mom molested me, my uncle (who I was named after) molested me? Can only those people who fit those narrow parameters be part of my support system? I am sorry, the name is not perfect, but it gets the discussion going.
    I think I would have less acceptance in the culture if I started pushing those archetypal buttons, dont you?
    Thanks for the post
    Warmly
    Jim

    • Casey says:

      It doesn’t always get the discussion going. Too often it shuts people down. You become a poorly understood label. Or told to take a pill which doesn’t resolve the underlying issues. There’s a lot of people on Facebook who clearly have NO concept of what depression entails, and they are are judging suicide as selfish and a cop-out. They are arguing the case for getting help without realizing the very nature of the condition isolates and changes your perceptions.

      Additionally, help is rarer than people think. Yes, there’s lots of potential help, but, long term care? People in my life have been too fucking busy for a cup of coffee for me, how the hell would I get them to sit with me long enough to listen to me unload my pain?

      Depression is not a very descriptive word. It doesn’t cover multitude of the emotional and physical manifestations that an individual might experience. The phrase “soul sickness” appeals to me. But that’s because I believe we have souls. Might not work for someone else.

      I ALSO think people who are merely, temporarily sad call themselves depressed, when they really all they are is “blue” or “in a funk”, something that perhaps will pass soon after it comes on.

      It’s a meaningless word.

      The kind of depression I dealt with…most of my life was of the existential, bordering on suicidal depression.

      I have only once reached out when I was suicidally depressed, otherwise, I have white-knuckled it on my own, writing on my blog even some of the most spiritual pieces (well, I think) I have AND the ones about PTSD recovery, while in the throes of suicidal despair of my own.

      What’s more…oddly enough, sometimes I miss my melancholy. I wrote some stuff that was immensely cathartic (for me).

      And, good point about the trauma. I’m in complete agreement and I’m glad you brought that up.

      While that particular post and it’s links do not talk about trauma, Monica does have resources about trauma.

      You can look here for links about trauma – which may or may not link trauma and suicide together (don’t know, I haven’t checked recently).

      http://beyondmeds.com/2012/10/10/trauma-infographic/

      And here’s a post I’d REALLY like you to take a look at, as there are links there, particularly one that links suicide to PTSD as well as suicide attempts themselves being an additional trauma (which compounds already existing trauma).

      https://thesprightlywriter.wordpress.com/2013/09/13/why-recovering-from-suicidal-crises-is-hard/

    • Casey says:

      “Should I tell people that my Dad beat me, my Mom molested me, my uncle (who I was named after) molested me? Can only those people who fit those narrow parameters be part of my support system? I am sorry, the name is not perfect, but it gets the discussion going.”

      Should you tell people about those things? Yes. Yes I do. I think the truth needs to be told. I think courage to speak the truth, no matter if people accept you for it, matters. If you can speak the truth and still be not only accepted, but loved, even by ONE person, then you reduce the amount of shame you carry.

      When I was 18, my boyfriend told me his Boy Scout leader molested both him and other boys in his troop. That was way back in 1988 (when he told me, a year or so before when it happened). I accepted and loved him then. Still do today.

      http://abc7chicago.com/archive/9199070/

      “A former scoutmaster and the Chicago Council of the Boy Scouts are named in an expanded lawsuit that alleges sexual abuse.

      More than a dozen former Boy Scouts have joined the suit, even though the former scoutmaster is already behind bars.

      Initially filed last December with just one plaintiff, the lawsuit has been expanded to include 15 more. All are now grown men, formally from Troop 1600 in Oak Lawn, who say they repressed memories of the abuse, until last fall, when the so-called perversion files were made public. The files are a collection of 1,200 previously secret files the Boy Scouts of America kept containing the names of known abusers who’d been part of the organization. ”

      http://patch.com/illinois/oaklawn/thomas-hacker-victims-and-acquaintances-speak-out

      “Hacker’s 17-year reign of terror in the Chicago region began in 1971 a year after he pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a 14-year-old boy in Indianapolis.”

      Someone had to come forward to get the ball rolling. I’m not sure HOW they found out, but they did. SOMEONE had to speak up. My boyfriend was in the last group he ever abused before being imprisoned.

      I think I would have less acceptance in the culture if I started pushing those archetypal buttons, dont you?”

      I accept you. I accept where you came from, and how you are now.

      You are loved, as you are this moment.

      I found, the more I tell my story, the less power it has over me.

  2. you’re very welcome…thank you for sharing.

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