Art journaling fun

Sometimes I think my art journals are boring.   I get to a point where I should add more elements or handwritten entries and I just get stuck.  I don’t know what I want to say.

In this two page spread, I used artist’s tape for the first time.  I realized that acrylic paint works nice, but gelly roll pens take a long time to dry on top of it.

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I hope some day I can get better with both drawing and water colors.  I don’t know how to make a nice, even water color wash without so many lines in it.  It kind of annoys me.

My daughter and I did some art journaling while at Panera Bread.

This was her layout:

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And this was mine:

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That was a fun hour for us, because there were a family of two parents and three girls at the table next to us talking about their upcoming trip overseas.   They left before we did and the mom looked at us and smiled.  I asked her where they were going, and she said to Serbia for a few weeks.  We chatted about how nice it is for children to travel overseas and get a chance to see what life is like in other countries.  I told her about when I went to Poland when I was 10.  This was in July of 1980, and the beginning of the mass strikes in Poland.  I remember we were told as a child if we didn’t leave when we did, we might not be able to leave.

As a child, I had no idea the political climate of the time, but a brief google search led me to this historical tidbit from NATO’s website on the documents related to events in Poland (198-1984):

In the summer of 1980, a series of strikes and factory occupations broke out across Poland in response to a government decision to raise the prices of consumer goods, especially meat. In August of that year a major strike took place in Gdansk, and from there it spread across the country, causing a massive disruption to the economy. The government chose negotiation rather than repression and retaliation, and on 31 August signed the Gdansk agreement, which granted workers numerous rights, including the ability to form free trade unions.

There was much concern in the West in general and in NATO specifically over the threat of intervention in Poland by the Soviet Union. Considerable military build-up occurred along the Soviet-Polish border. Several eastern European leaders, notably those from East Germany and Czechoslovakia, made threats and statements about intervening. The NATO policy at that time was that Poland should be able to manage its own affairs without outside interference.

Yeah, I’m going to have to do a post on my time in Poland.  I recently came across old photos of my three weeks traveling all around Poland (Warsaw, Gdansk, Cracow, and Zakopane).

Strange.  So strange.

Anyway, back to art…

Sometimes the scenes I paint beg for more elements and then I just get stuck, not wanting to ruin a relatively decent picture.

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About Casey

“the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes ‘Awww!’ ~ Jack Kerouac, On The Road Again
This entry was posted in Art Journaling, Art with Kids, Creativity, History, Mixed Media, Poland. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Art journaling fun

  1. Joe Soares says:

    Very, very interesting!! Beautiful pictures and with nice writings..Like that and the text about Poland.
    XX

  2. Thank you, Joe.

    I’ll have to scan my photographs in. I spent the afternoon thinking about my trip to Poland when I was a girl. It was so exciting and interesting to me. I still remember the things we did and can visualize the stuff that happened. It was very neat.

    Take care,

    XO

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