Quotes from Rainer Maria Rilke

A Poet’s Guide to Life

“There is only a single, urgent task: to attach oneself someplace to nature, to that which is strong, striving and bright with unreserved readiness, and then to move forward in one’s efforts without any calculation or guile, even when engaged in the most trivial and mundane activities.  Each time we thus reach out with joy, each time we cast our view toward distances that have not yet been touched, we transform not only the present moment and the one following it, but also alter the past within us, weave it into the pattern of our existence, and dissolve the foreign body of pain whose exact composition we ultimately do not know.  Just as we do not know how much this foreign body, once it has been thus dissolved, might impart to are bloodstream.

If we wish to be let in on the secrets of life, we must be mindful of two things: first, there is the great melody to which things and scents, feelings and past lives, dawns and dreams contribute in equal measure, and then there are the individual voices that complete and perfect this full chorus.  And to establish the basis for a work of  art, that is, for an image of life lived more deeply, lived more than life as it is lived today, and the possibility that it remains throughout the ages, we have to adjust and set into their proper relation these two voices: the one belonging to a specific moment and the other to the group of people living in it.”

Letters to a Young Poet

You are looking outwards, and of all things that is what you now must not do.  Nobody can advise you.  Nobody.  There is only one single means. Go inside yourself.  Discover the motive that bids you write: examine whether it sends its roots down to the deepest places of your heart, confess to yourself whether you would have to die if writing were denied you.  This before all: ask yourself in the quietest hour of your night: must I write?  Dig down into yourself for a deep answer.  And if this should be in the affirmative, if you may meet this solemn question with a strong and simple “I must”, then build your life according to this necessity; your life must, right to its most unimportant and insignificant hour, become a token and a witness to this impulse.  Then draw near to Nature.  Then try, as if you were one of those first men, to say what you see and experience and love and lose.  Do not write love poems; avoid at first those forms which are too familiar and usual: they are the most difficult, for fully matured strength is needed to make an individual contribution where good and in part brilliant traditions exist in plenty.  Turn therefore from the common themes to those which your own everyday life affords; depict your sorrows and desires, your passing thoughts and belief in some kind of beauty- depict all that with heartfelt, quiet, humble sincerity and use to express yourself the things that surround you, the images of your dreams and the objects of your memory.  If your everyday life seems poor to you, do not accuse it; accuse yourself, tell yourself you are not poet enough to summon up its riches; since for the creator there is no poverty and no poor or unimportant place.  And even if you were in a prison whose walls allowed none of the sounds of the world to reach your senses – would you not still have always your childhood, that precious, royal richness, that treasure house of memories? Turn your attention there.  Try to raise the submerged sensations of that distant past; your personality will grow stronger, your solitude will extend itself and will become a twilit dwelling which the noise of others passes by in the distance. – And if from this turning inwards, from this sinking into your private world, there come verses, you will not think to ask anyone whether they are good verses.  You will not attempt, either, to interest journals in these works: for you will see them in your own dear genuine possession, a portion and a voice in your life.  A work of art is good if it has grown out of necessity.

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About Casey

“the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes ‘Awww!’ ~ Jack Kerouac, On The Road Again
This entry was posted in Inspirational quotations, Letters To A Young Poet, Rainer Maria Rilke, writing tips and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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